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Crime Donald Trump Elections

Rudy Now Facing Racketeering Charges That Could Send Him To Prison For The Rest Of His Life

Over the past four years, few people have been more fanatically devoted to former President Donald Trump than the ex-mayor of New York City, Rudy Giuliani, who allegedly went to Ukraine seeking dirt on President Joe Biden and only succeeded in getting Trump impeached with his actions.

Now, however, with Trump out of office, Giuliani is coming under increased scrutiny that has him on the verge of being sent to prison for decades if he’s found guilty by a jury of his peers.

The New York Times reports that Giuliani, along with other close associates of the former president, is under scrutiny for his role in spreading lies about how the 2020 election was supposedly “stolen,” which has drawn the attention of Fulton County, Georgia, District Attorney Fani T. Willis, who is considering filing racketeering charges against the former mayor:

“Ms. Willis is also open to considering not just conspiracy but racketeering charges. As she put it in the interview, racketeering could apply to anyone who uses a legal entity — presumably anything from a government agency to that person’s own public office — to conduct overt acts for an illegal purpose. In this case, it applies to the pressure the president and his allies exerted on Georgia officials to overturn the election.”

When the word “racketeering” is used, many people immediately think of mafia kingpins and others involved in organized crime, but Willis notes that it can also apply to cheating or elections:

“I always tell people when they hear the word racketeering, they think of ‘The Godfather,’” but she noted that it could also extend to otherwise lawful organizations that are used to break the law.

“If you have various overt acts for an illegal purpose, I think you can — you may — get there,” she said.

And if indeed Willis does “get there,” it would be catastrophic for Giuliani, who is already 76 years old. The penalties for racketeering in the Peach State range from 5 to 20 years in prison, meaning that if the president’s attorney is convicted, he would be looking at what would amount to a death sentence.

For her part, D.A. Willis makes it clear she won’t hesitate to take on anyone who breaks the law in her county:

“It is really not a choice — to me, it’s an obligation. Each D.A. in the country has a certain jurisdiction that they’re responsible for. If alleged crime happens within their jurisdiction, I think they have a duty to investigate it.”

That dedication to service could well be what brings down anyone who tried to change the vote count in Georgia last November, including the former president, who is also under investigation by Willis’s office. As the old saying reminds us, “Let justice be done though the heavens fall.”

 

By Andrew Bradford

Proud progressive journalist and political adviser living behind enemy lines in Red America.

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